A Glimpse into Fairview’s Past

A Glimpse into Fairview’s Past

Former Fairview resident, Lindy Fisher compiled many articles regarding the history of Fairview. Through her research, she found that Jesse and Frank James spent time in Fairview. “Jesse James and Frank James…two brothers who were among the most notorious outlaws of the American West, engaging in robberies that came to typify the hazards of the 19th-century frontier as it has been portrayed in motion-picture westerns.” (Britannica.com)

In Fisher’s articles titled ‘Frank and Jesse James in Collin County’ (Part One and Two) Fisher wrote, “Frank and Jesse James were raised and lived in Missouri.  But since their cousins, Tuck and Woot Hill lived in McKinney; they spent quite a bit of time in this area, especially during the winters of the Civil War. They later returned to attend the Civil War reunions that were held in McKinney at the Kirkpatrick home.  They also attended Civil War reunions yearly at the Wetsel home in Allen that was located on Highway 5, but has now been moved to the Historic Village on St. Mary’s Drive in Allen.” The Younger brothers were members of the James gang, known as the James-Younger Gang (legendsofamerica.com). Fisher wrote, “The Younger clan relocated to Lucas, Texas, for a few years when they were systematically burned out of their homes by the Union troops under General Order No. 11, for supporting the raiders…. With the Younger family living in the Lucas area, the James brothers were sure to have passed down Country Club Road and Highway 5 many times watering their horses at every friendly farm along the way. With their pleasant congenial conversation mixed with their knowledge of the Bible, they often talked themselves into the finest bed in the house. And often into the graces of the farmer’s daughter, so says one source of local handed down lore. There actually could be some direct offspring in this area.”

Col. Apple (second from left) shaking hands with former president, then senator, Lyndon B. Johnson at the old McKinney Airport. LBJ was here to attend an oil lease sale in the 1950s.

Col. Apple (second from left) shaking hands with former president, then senator, Lyndon B. Johnson at the old McKinney Airport. LBJ was here to attend an oil lease sale in the 1950s.

Fisher explained that Colonel George Apple, an auctioneer who auctioned oil well leases for the state of Texas, gave Fairview its name. He named his dairy the Fairview Dairy because he liked the fair view of the green pastures around his dairy. Fairview Dairy was located on Highway 5. The name Fairview was chosen because of all the work that Col. George Apple had put into incorporating the town in 1958.

Fisher, who has a masters degree in archaeology, planned the dedication of Fairview’s Houston and Texas Central Railroad Historic District which occurred Jul 25, 2012. She said, “It was quite a show.  The police directed traffic and an emergency ambulance was available since we had many elderly people going down the rather steep creek embankments to the bridge site.” Fisher was asked by David Petefish, an avid historian who has roots in Fairview, to save the large arched stone bridge as it was suffering from erosion. The first bridge was built out of wood in a hurry and then replaced after it most likely washed away. Fisher said, “With the State Archaeological Landmark designation, DART is attempting to save it.” It took her four years to get the historical dedication. The bridge is located at the old railroad underpass on Hwy 5, over Sloan Creek. However, visitors are not allowed at this site until the area is developed.

Local historian, Lindy Fisher points to the inside of the bridge in Fairview’s Houston and Texas Central Railroad Historic District during the dedication in 2012 of the site as a State Archaeological Landmark. Noted historian Ken Byler is to her left.

Local historian, Lindy Fisher points to the inside of the bridge in Fairview’s Houston and Texas Central Railroad Historic District during the dedication in 2012 of the site as a State Archaeological Landmark. Noted historian Ken Byler is to her left.

Fisher lived in Fairview on Timberwood Lane with her family in the subdivision of River Oaks I for 26 years. She recently moved to Dallas and bought a vacation home in Hawaii to be near her daughter and family. Her daughter’s macadamia nut orchard business was covered in lava and they relocated the business to the Fisher’s farm.

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